Handling Failure In & Out Of The Classroom - StudentLingo Sample

Erin Hoag
11 months agoNovember 15, 2021
Example:  How To Help Students With Failure Tip
Erin@ieinfo.org
Tip:  Make a list of possible contributing factors and possible solutions for each
Anonymous
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
Failure is a part of life. We must fail to learn and grow. Failure can seem scary, but it's all a part of life and we must embrace failure and learn and grow from it.
Andrea Arias
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
I remind students that failure is a necessary part of the overall journey and that we learn just as much from those experiences as we do when we are successful! I advise them to keep the experience in perspective and that almost everything is "fixable". Then, once we get the immediate emotions acknowledged, we move into developing the tangible and realistic strategy that can bring some recovery. It all starts with recognizing that this experience is really painful and that it is my responsibility to guide them to a safe perspective, then the work can begin!
Andrea Arias
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
Forgot my email:
aarias68@calstatela.edu
Jill K. Drowne
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
I work with students to do a task-analysis of their errors. They look for (5) different types of errors that we discuss, then tally their errors to find trends in the data.  With those trends, we can tailor their studying approach to their future exams and preparation in advance of each one.
Jill K. Drowne
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
Email:  j.drowne@scnm.edu
Andrea Hendricks
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
How to Help Students with Failure
ahendricks@gsu.edu
Tip: Failure is not final nor does it devalue you as a person. Failure is a chance to learn by reflecting on the preparation and practices that resulted in the grade. I ask my students to create a test preparation log where they list the time and activities that they used to prepare for the exam. Now evaluate those in light of the grade to see where improvements and changes can be made.
Angela Bonilla Rasmussen
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
(angela.rasmussen@scc.spokane.edu) 
It's so hard to unlearn negative associations with learning, but in the classroom, we have to look at failure are part of the learning process. Focusing on growth mindsets, and doing exam wrapper assignments are keys to normalizing failure. One of my best wrapper assignments was asking students to predict their grades on a recent exam, then passing them back and asking them to address whether they did better or worse than expected and explain why.
Scott Segalewitz
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
segalewitz@udayton.edu
Students who fail at a task, course, etc., should be encouraged to assess what what caused the poor result (failure analysis). Then develop a plan to change actions or behaviors. They need to realize that similar actions tend to lead to similar results.
Jen Ryley Welsh (welsh_j@mitchell.ed)
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
One of my biggest (but not only) failures in college was the failure to try. I missed out on several opportunities, including taking a course that would have opened doors to great internship opportunities, because I failed to see myself as ready for the challenge. My failure to stretch beyond my comfort zone actually set me back. It took me a while to figure out that trying something and not getting the desired result the first time was a much more valuable learning experience than sitting on the sidelines and failing to get in the game.
Joanne Goldwater
10 months agoDecember 1, 2021
As I learned recently from one of the iFit Trainers while working out on my treadmill, the difference between what you have and what you want is what you do. Failing allows a person to learn how to bounce back (improve resiliency); identify what's important to them and reset some goals (as needed); understand that we all fail at something in our lifetime and in most cases, we can recover; that there are many people on- and off-campus (including family members, friends, faculty, staff, other students, etc.) who can/will support them as long as they are willing to ask for help and work with us. There are many people invested in their success. Seek and use the available support systems.
Kristin Puckett
10 months agoDecember 2, 2021
kpuckett@dacc.edu

Wow - such good advice in this thread! I think many times we associate all failure with being negative but it's generally an impactful moment that we learn to make adjustments for improvements and find a better path. If I have students that are routinely failing or not making academic progress, I have them sit and reflect on what is hindering their progress and then create a plan to move forward rather than repeating old behaviors that are holding them back. I do share my failures with students when I think it may be helpful for them to hear that I was in a similar situation.
Anonymous
10 months agoDecember 2, 2021
I go about this differently. Failure is such a negative word. I help my students to understand that you either succeed or you learn.  Take the word failure out and explain to them that you only fail if you don’t try.  If you try and do not succeed, then you are now presented with a learning opportunity
Erin Hoag
8 months agoFebruary 17, 2022
Thank you so much to everyone who posted, as all of the tips were so beneficial and there are some awesome takeaways.  Andrea Hendricks was selected as the winner.  Check out her post above.
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